Feminism…Mary Kassian…"You’ve Come a Long Way Baby!"

“Alvin Toffler, the author of Future Shock called The Feminine Mystique the book that pulled the trigger on history. Indeed, once woman accepted this very basic premise of needing and trusting no other authority except her own, personal truth, she set her foot on a path that would take her, and ultimately the whole of society, in a direction diametrically opposed to the heart and the purposes and the ways of God.”

Yvonne Welch, a woman dear to my heart who has had a profound influence on my life, told me of a speaker I needed to hear who was featured on Nancy Leigh DeMoss. (Mrs. Welch has an interview on DeMoss’s show also, if you’d like to look it up.)

Once I started listening, I couldn’t stop. I gathered my oldest daughter to listen with me, and the only words I can think of to describe this historically accurate, intelligent and profoundly important discussion about the impact of feminism are…STANDING OVATION.

Put it on while you wash the dishes, or make it part of your school day. However you need to make time, I think this series is crucial–not only in helping us understand and hold on to truth in a wavering culture, but to help us give an accurate answer to those who question.

Each part is only around 9 minutes long….you’ll be glad you listened; well, most of you 😉

(BTW, she is a professor of women’s studies at a theological seminary, so she breaks the mold of the typical assertions made of women who embrace biblical gender roles….thought some would find that interesting.)

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37 Responses to “Feminism…Mary Kassian…"You’ve Come a Long Way Baby!"”

  1. Mother of Dog says:

    I’m editing from another site here because I think a colleague said it better about this silly talk that Ms. Kassian gave:

    The short version: Patriarchy is fabulous, feminism is unnatural.

    Kassian is particularly fond of romanticizing the imaginary perfect world of Leave it to Beaver, suggesting that life back in the 1950s (before darned feminism came around) actually was like the show.

    “Once married, a woman could normally count on her husband to financially support her and the children…

    Pornography and rape and homosexuality, sexual perversion, sexual addiction, sexually transmitted diseases were uncommon and rarely encountered.”

    I don’t know about your families, but back in the day my married Nana was working her tail off to support her kids because my grandfather’s salary wasn’t enough. And rape most certainly existed, though maybe it wasn’t called that.

    Kassian thinks that today’s woman has lost her way, largely by…well, having rights.

    “In the past decade, we’ve been inundated with the message that when it comes to relationships, women can hook up, be in a casual or long-term relationship, live common-law, get married or not, get married and then get divorced, get pregnant or abort the babies, sleep around, live with a guy or a girl, have sex with a guy or a girl, and participate in a whole assortment of immoral and perverted behavior as long as they are friends. In other words, woman makes her own rules and sets her own standards, and as long as she is nice, it really doesn’t matter what she does. Who are you to judge?”

    Um, yeah. Isn’t that the point? Judge not lest ye be judged?…It seems just wrong to me to suggest that a woman can’t value her independence and the rights our foremothers fought for and also love God.

    Yup. *APPLAUSE*

    The movement is towards women having only ONE choice EVER – who to marry. She will, of course, stay home and be a homemaker in a patriarchal marriage – having been homeschooled and not going to college. While for men – ah, limitless choices! And if a woman doesn’t like it or feels that her intellect or experience needs a wider world – she is somehow “anti-God.”

    I cry for all your daughters. I cry for all the resources lost because they don’t have the parts necessary to do what they might like to do – for all the ways in which they can influence the world BESIDES having children. Most of you were out in the world and then decided to embrace the home – you’re even denying that choice to them! Again, I see nothing wrong with being homemakers or not working – that isn’t the point.

    Oh and for Ms. Kassian to conflate a stupid cigarette ad with the very ability that you all can READ and WRITE – because you know that’s fairly recent? And because of early feminism? That’s just shameful and disgusting.

  2. Word Warrior says:

    MOD,

    Have you listened to the entire speech? I’m assuming not, as she addresses some of the very things you mentioned and explains them in great detail.

    Why doesn’t anyone want to answer this: despite the problems that have always existed simply because we’re human, it is a fact that the world is simply turned upside down, with every social ill increasing as we move farther and farther away from the traditional role of marriage. The rate of all the social problems she mentioned has skyrocketed in DIRECT proportion to the abandoning of family values.

    Why is no one upset about that? The facts are so plain, that we can argue this from a non-biblical standpoint.

    Feminism has wreaked havoc. No questions.

    Your very comment is full of the misconceptions that feminism teaches…”your poor daughters…only one choice…etc”

    What Kassian is pointing us to is not the ONLY choice, but the BEST choice. For everyone. Women, children, men and society.

    The options are limitless for the woman free of the chains of a career. We’re not talking about taking away choices–we’re talking about expanding them! Feminists are indeed so blind.

    So the poison continues to spread, and the menace of society continues to eat us away. That’s healthy. Why don’t we all say, “Who cares what feminism does to the world? who cares what works or what doesn’t? Who cares about the tragedy of divorce, sexual abuse, homeless women and children, broken homes, unwed mothers–who cares! As long as I live behind the facade of freedom. Give me “liberty” AND give me death.”

  3. Katherine says:

    I love Mary Kassian, and Nancy Leigh Demoss. I’m glad you featured her talks on you blog. I would have mentioned her to you before but I thought that since she held a position outside of the home, you might have objected. But anyway, yes, she’s awesome! I love all her books as well!

  4. Bethany Hudson says:

    While I like Ms. Kassian’s look at the Virginia Slims ads, I cannot say I agree with everything she said here.

    Like MOD pointed out, I think Ms. Kassian put too much emphasis on the 1950s. While I think she was using it as an example of her own childhood, it could be seen as an idealization of what was, in essence, a decade of hypocrisy. Already at this time, the homemaker was being “replaced” by the “expert,” doffing folk knowledge and intution for what the latest commercial or propaganda recommended.

    Personally, I can’t stand idealization of “Leave It to Beaver.” If you’re going to refer to a television show that gives a good, honest look at the roles of men and women a couple of generations ago, you’d be better off with “The Waltons.” “Leave It to Beaver” was too over-simplified and narrow in its scope for examining a real American family of the day. “The Waltons” looks not at a priveleged middle class family of four but at a large, multi-generational family struggling through the Great Depression. The only idealization in it is love of family, rather than idealization of lifestyle, something that is unique to a particular culture and class. But enough about tv shows. They’re all fictitious, anyway.

    Moreover, I was a little disheartened at Ms. Kassian’s over-emphasis on marriage. While I believe that many (dare I say most) men and women are called to the vocation of marriage, I don’t think it’s going to be everyone’s calling or everyone’s ideal. I do agree with her that children should be born in wedlock and that infidelity, divorce, etc. are a deplorable and sad condition of our modern society which was not common or accepted 50 years ago. However, I do not think that every human being is meant for marriage, and to idealize marriage at the expense of other life choices and vocations is to demean what may be the true calling of another person’s life, just as much as idealizing a career demeans the woman who stays home to care for her family.

    MOD – I think while you made some very good points, you are missing some of the overall picture of what Ms. Kassian was discussing. The devastation of abortion, divorce and infidelity is NOT the sort of “liberty” that our foremothers fought for–and this is the sort of thing that Ms. Kassian is discussing. She’s not saying every woman should get back to the stove with her high heels (despite her references to June Cleaver, which I think she was using more as an illustration of a time than anything else). She’s saying that the “liberty” women thought they were signing on for with feminism has ended, often enough, in despair and destruction.

    You say, “The movement is towards women having only ONE choice EVER – who to marry. She will, of course, stay home and be a homemaker in a patriarchal marriage – having been homeschooled and not going to college. While for men – ah, limitless choices! And if a woman doesn’t like it or feels that her intellect or experience needs a wider world – she is somehow ‘anti-God.'”

    I agree with you that the oversimplification of idealizing marriage as the one choice for women is inappropriate. It is this part of the anti-feminism movement that I often have problems with. While I think that a wife and mother has a sacred duty to her husband, children, and home, I cannot accept that ALL women are meant to marry. Those that do not want to have such a life may likely find their calling elsewhere–in a career or in the religious life consecrated to God. But, I don’t think Ms. Kassian is saying women’s choices are limitted to marriage the four walls of their house while men’s choices are limitless. She clearly points out that men are called to be protectors and providers of their families. This is a big job, too. And, many men would consider it a sacrifice to be responsible for the needs of their families and to have to be away from them and in the workplace all day. Moreover, Ms. Kassian specifically supports education (she mentions college education) for both men and women, so I’m not sure where you concluded that she wanted all women to be homeschooled and kept out of college?

    All in all, I think this lecture gave some food for thought, and I thank you for sharing it, Kelly.

    ~Bethany

  5. Mother of Dog says:

    I did listen, Kelly. And I reject her ideas for ME. You have every right to do as you see fit.

    Best choice? No, I don’t see that. To ask for anything else is selfish? No, sorry again. You have a litany against “blind feminism.” Let me suggest it is YOU that is blind. There are many women in the Evangelical community that cannot leave abusive husbands and terrible marriages…I won’t go on. You know about it.

    “The problems she mentioned has skyrocketed in DIRECT proportion to the abandoning of family values.”

    Correlation does not equal Causation. All those social problems existed, they just weren’t discussed. It’s exactly like statistics about stolen children – they have NOT gone up – people simply feel less safe. Correlation does NOT equal causation. Simple.

  6. Mother of Dog says:

    I agree with you Bethany – I’m concerned with the model that a girl stays home until marriage – IF she marries. But what if she doesn’t? What if she isn’t a mother? What then?

    Maybe I don’t see the “devastation” of feminism. To me, it’s a question of critical thinking skills. If you don’t like the model, don’t follow it. Don’t become a bank president. I don’t remember any guns pointing at anyone forcing women to become real estate agents, lol! It’s a little silly to look at the feminist movement that way, in my opinion.

    Whereas the anti-feminist movement is loaded with “YOU MUST…”

  7. Mother of Dog says:

    Bethany, I was referring to posts on this site where the idea of college for women was debated. I concede your point! 😉

  8. Bethany Hudson says:

    MOD- I’ll just speak for myself, since I think issues like sexuality are highly personal (despite the fact that everything is public, nowadays). I do understand what you’re saying about the feminist movement: “if you don’t like it, don’t drink the Kool-aid”. However, my problem isn’t that I feel like anyone is holding me at gun-point expecting me to worship Betty Friedan. My problem is that our culture seems to idealize many of the Feminist ideals without understanding the multiply facets of where they came from and what they have caused. Just as it is “wrong” to teach school children that the Civil War was fought to end slavery, I believe it is “wrong” to sell women a bill of goods that Feminism was instituted to give them “choices.” I think that’s a part of it, as the emancipation of black slaves was a PART of the Civil War–but it wasn’t the only or even preeminent cause, and it wasn’t the only thing that happened as a result of the war. The history of Feminism is similar–and similarly mistaught. Of course, there are many idelogies out there that I don’t agree with, and I have no desire to go around eradicating them. But, I will speak up about what I think is propagandistic oversimplification of something so pervasively accepted in our society.

    Of course, I also disagree with some aspects of the Feminist movement on religious grounds: I don’t believe we are Skinnerian blank slates. I believe that there are unique differences in the essences of men and women that make them complementary. I believe in equity over equality of the sexes–because I think it is what is truly the most just and because I believe it is based on truth rather the ideology. I believe that marriage is a vocation not a “life choice” and thus comes with responsibilities, duties, obligations, and restrictions as much as blessings. I believe that abortion is wrong in every way. I believe that married people–both men and women–need to understand that they have responsibilities to their families and to society. I deplore the individualistic rhetoric of our modern age and the disregard of the family as an integral necessity for individual and societal good. I disagree completely with the “have your cake and eat it, too” mentality that I was spoonfed in school: that I could be an excellent wife, mother, artist, professional, homemaker, etc. No one ever told me that I would have to make choices or just how short a 24-hour day can be.

    These are some of the aspects of Feminism that I disagree with. I’m not saying at all that some women’s rights were not worth fighting for. Unfortunately, I believe the Feminist movement used such rights (the right to fair wages, the right to testify in court, the acknowledgement of what rape really is) were just pawns used by women who had another agenda altogether to get the common woman-on-the-street to go along with the agenda of the day. I think that such rights could–and should–have been demanded and defended by another vehicle than the Feminist movement.

    Okay…hopping off my soapbox now.

    ~Bethany

  9. Word Warrior says:

    Bethany,

    I think that was a very well-stated position of feminism. Feminists forget that none of us agrees with inferiority of women or the things that go along with that. (It’s part of the blindness, I think. They’ve been told anything besides feminism is male-domination and door-mat women.) We are all for equal rights, in the context of individual roles, responsibilities and self-worth.

    Part of the destruction of feminism was the obliteration of anything else. They claim “equal choices for all” and degrade the role of traditional wife and motherhood at the same time. It’s an inconsistent world-view.

    I especially agree with:

    “I’m not saying at all that some women’s rights were not worth fighting for. Unfortunately, I believe the Feminist movement used such rights…

    …were just pawns used by women who had another agenda altogether to get the common woman-on-the-street to go along with the agenda of the day.”

  10. Mother of Dog says:

    It seems to me, Kelly that you degrade feminism. I am not condescending to you here. You are condescending to me. I have never insisted that you be a fan of my life! I, however, like it just fine. Now I don’t know why you feel somehow that women who aren’t Evangelical are looking down on you. It may surprise you that I have firmly Evangelical Christian friends, close friends. I’ve been to church with them. I am often moved by their faith. I’m not the bigot you seem to think I am. Are you? 😉

    Bethany, I respect your obvious intelligence and your choices. I also respect your religion. But this statement:
    “I believe the Feminist movement used such rights (the right to fair wages, the right to testify in court, the acknowledgement of what rape really is) were just pawns used by women who had another agenda altogether to get the common woman-on-the-street to go along with the agenda of the day. I think that such rights could–and should–have been demanded and defended by another vehicle than the Feminist movement.”

    Is terribly wrong-headed in my opinion. There was not some huge conspiracy to drive women from the home. There was a lot of unhappiness. It’s fine to point a finger at Feminism – but I don’t think it’s deserved.

  11. HappyHermit says:

    Interesting. Thank you for sharing.

  12. Word Warrior says:

    MOD,

    I do not intend to be condescending to you or any person–could you be specific about how I was? It is truly not my intent.

    I am condescending to a worldview I think is tearing families a part–I make no apologies for that.

    Your comment…

    “There was not some huge conspiracy to drive women from the home. There was a lot of unhappiness.”

    Oh how I wish you were right. Do a bit more delving into the issue–go back to Marxism, the “ism” that birthed feminism. See exactly what the “conspiracy” was…they didn’t try to hide it.

    I think Kassian addresses this very thing in her upcoming talks–the “screen of unhappy women” to push the agenda.

  13. Bethany Hudson says:

    MOD – I think you will find that if you read some of the more prominent Feminist texts from the spearhead figures of the movement, you will find that, for political and economic reasons, those particular women who were driving the movement DID want to get women out of the home en masse. Again, I don’t think was the goal of your “average” Feminist, even as I don’t believe that the goal of your “average” Civil War soldier was to pit industrialism against agriculture. But, it’s the tail that wagged the dog, so to speak. I believe there were MANY feminists in the ranks who did NOT believe in the more radical ideology. Unfortunately, that radical ideology is what ultimately tended to shape the economic and political tenor of the movement, and this is responsible for much of the unfortunate fallout of the Movement. Anyway, that’s just my stance from studying the period. Don’t get me wrong, there are even some central Feminist figures who I love. Susan B. Anthony grew lived in my hometown and I studied her extensively. I am also a huge fan of Sojourner Truth. But, I don’t think these two particular women characterize the central agenda of what Feminism became after their time.
    ~Bethany

  14. Anonymous says:

    Well, Kelly, you speak often of wishing people would learn to think critically. Those of us with different views are expected to think critically about our lives – if we disagree with you, we are merely failing to think. I wonder if you expect the same critical thought of your own children in regard to what you teach them, the same questioning of what they have been taught. Or does it not matter, because you’re right? 😉

  15. Word Warrior says:

    Anon,

    I challenge people to think critically because the general notion is to go with the flow…I don’t accuse everyone of “not thinking” just because they disagree with me (quote me to prove it).

    More often than not, I hear others say, “I’ve never really thought about it”…and because we are so indoctrinated by our school system with what THEY want us to think, I DO believe we “think we’re thinking”, when often we’re not!

    I want people to study history beyond what they’ve been taught by jaded text books; to lay aside predisposed ideas and prejudices.

    I’ve been on both sides of the fence, and everything I pour my heart out about here is only out of a deep desire for others to discover the truth that was hidden from me for so long.

  16. Word Warrior says:

    Anon,

    Regarding my children…”truth” is right, not me.

    When they’ve been taught truth they can see the lies so plainly around them that they are always thinking critically.

    Of course I expect them to question and think! But until you’ve been there–I guess it’s hard to explain.

    The lies of feminism and of our culture are so blaring to them, they can’t fathom how others don’t see it. That’s from THEIR critical observance, not mine.

  17. Kathy, Jeff's Wife says:

    I thank you Kelly for making me think…daily! You help me put into words what I think/feel/believe.

    There are families falling apart all around me at this time and it is because of selfishness and feminism, not just on the women’s part, but because both husband and wife believe in feminism.

    I am so glad my ear is not on the bottom of my foot. We all have our function, to do what we were created to do.

  18. Deanna says:

    Kelly, What do you think the next ISM wave will be?

    I did listen to all the parts of Kassian’s presentation. Being born in ’55, so much of what she spoke about was a part of the culture that was present in smalltown America.

    Overall I thought her talk was somewhat polished, easy to listen to and pleasant enough.

    Towards the ending of her presentation she mentioned Jesus as the solution.

    I don’t think Kassian’s presentation was meant to be “A Come to Jesus Meeting” with Altar Call while singing Just As I am, but more of an affirmation of what the overall conference was focusing on.

    Wished she had been more in depth about why humans need a born again experience and the infilling of the Holy Spirit. Perhaps one of the other speakers shared this.

    Maybe you’d share in a nutshell why we need to be born again and experience the infilling of the Holy Spirit. What is missing in a person before Christ becomes Saviour and then Lord.

    Deanna

  19. Misty Smith says:

    I particularly enjoyed part 5. The heart of this matter is Christ. Here lies the crossroad…do we put our faith in Him or in the world? One who openly chooses feminism is rejecting Christ by default because it is contrary to His leading. He is our Creator and the author of the female gender with all of its characteristics and callings. So… the question is… do you believe that Christ is your Creator and that He holds the key to your personal contentment and liberation? Yes or No

    One simply cannot be a feminist (promoter of self) while continuing to be a true follower of Christ which requires one to nourish Christ’s truths within your life.

    Proclaimed feminists make their choice and it is difficult for two differing worldviews to reason with one another, though you all make a good attempt.

    According to my personal testimony I found that though embracing biblical womanhood may at first seem disruptive and unsettling to my quest for personal happiness and liberation, I have been met with a pleasant surprise!! I have found that Jesus Christ is the key and in His Word there is great power for my life. Christ’s precepts concerning biblical womanhood has become an ESSENTIAL to my quest for personal liberation.

    Listen to the words of Jesus in Luke 4:18 “The Spirit of the LORD [is] upon Me, Because He has anointed Me To preach the gospel to [the] poor; He has sent Me to heal the brokenhearted, To proclaim liberty to [the] captives And recovery of sight to [the] blind, [To] set at liberty those who are oppressed;”

    Check this out! A description of behavior as a sign of the times:

    2Ti 3:6 For of this sort are those who creep into households and make captives of gullible women loaded down with sins, led away by various lusts,

    2Ti 3:7 always learning and never able to come to the knowledge of the truth.

  20. Word Warrior says:

    Bethany,

    I have not stopped thinking about this comment you made…

    “I believe that marriage is a vocation not a “life choice” and thus comes with responsibilities, duties, obligations, and restrictions as much as blessings.”

    There is so much truth there, I’m going to have to do a separate post about it 😉 It is parallel with my ICU nurse analogy.

    Honestly, I’ve never thought about this using the words you used. When it is simply a choice, we can just walk away when we’re bored; but if it’s a choice of vocation, we stay there and do the job.

    Heavy.

  21. Anonymous says:

    Kelly,

    I haven’t listened to Kassian’s talk yet but will hopefully get to it this evening.

    I do however, have a question for you.

    I am a reader/lurker of your site and have commented maybe once or twice. Having read your thoughts I think I have a pretty good idea of your thoughts but please correct me if I am wrong.

    *If a woman is a wife or mother than that is her only calling.

    *That you are raising your daughters to be stay at home, homeschooling wives and mothers.

    *That you yourself enjoy learning and will pass that on to your daughters but that you won’t send them for formal higher learning.

    *That you feel any wife/mother who is working outside the home is living outside of the Bible.

    So if the above things are true, then why would you link to a woman who has a career and an education. You agree with what she teaches but if your honest with yourself you don’t agree with her lifestyle.

    She was writing books, teaching and speaking in the early 1980s. If her children are young adults now then they were young children in the 80s. I am pretty sure that she brought in a salary for her work. So essentially she was a working mother. How can you endorse her when she lives outside of what you feel is Biblical?

    I want you to know that I am asking these questions not to start an argument but because I really do want to know. I truly want to understand your position.

    KJM

  22. Word Warrior says:

    Some of what you said is true, but not all.

    “She was writing books, teaching and speaking in the early 1980s. If her children are young adults now then they were young children in the 80s. I am pretty sure that she brought in a salary for her work.”

    I write books, teach and speak (not often, but every now and then). I’m not at all opposed to women earning money! I’m for it. I see it as one of the added freedoms a mother can have if it is carefully balanced with her first duties.

    Furthermore, I didn’t feel it was necessary for me to agree with every choice she has made in order to acknowledge the truth of what she is speaking.

    Although I hold certain basic principles, I do not dissect every woman’s situation and call her “biblical or not biblical”…there is room for personal conviction (such as holding a job when one’s children are grown) that I may or may not agree with, but don’t call “sin”.

    Hope that explains 😉

  23. Anonymous says:

    Bethany,

    “I believe that marriage is a vocation not a “life choice” and thus comes with responsibilities, duties, obligations, and restrictions as much as blessings.”

    I love this quote! So much truth in one little paragraph.

    KJM

  24. Misty Smith says:

    Proverbs 31:16 “She considers a field and buys it; From her profits she plants a vineyard.”

    KJM – Thanks for allowing us to share that biblical womanhood does not mean that you cannot make a profit and pursue business adventures. The distinction is that Prov. 31 woman most likely included her children in the adventure.

    This debate is plagued with the lack of understanding of what the bible teaches concerning the role of women. Some of these posts can be presented as evidence that propaganda, like that of the Virginia Slims ads mentioned, which show woman bound in the kitchen and doting on her dominating man, have indeed mangled the perception of God’s design.
    I implore us all to remove such influence and seek the truth of God’s word. Let us allow the Scripture to shape our understanding of God’s design for woman.

    I think many will be pleasantly surprised.

  25. Anonymous says:

    Misti said-KJM – Thanks for allowing us to share that biblical womanhood does not mean that you cannot make a profit and pursue business adventures. The distinction is that Prov. 31 woman most likely included her children in the adventure.

    I actually agree with you expect for the part of the P31 woman including her children, I don’t see any Biblical proof of that.
    I don’t think that its unBiblical at all for women to earn a living. I think that culturally its likely but its also likely that she had maids to help out with her family. There is no way for us to really know her exact family situation.

    Kelly, thanks for explaining.

    For the record I think that if a women chooses to be a wife and/or mother than her first priority should be her home and family. But I do not believe that everything she does has to be in the home. I truly believe that this is a matter or your heart not your location.

    KJM

  26. Deanna says:

    Misty Smith,
    With liking part 5, what you have said is beautifully written.
    Very well put.

  27. Misty Smith says:

    I can hardly go to the grocery store with out my nursing babies! Remember she didn’t practice birth control, she always had a nursing baby.

    We know she remained in close contact based on cultural practices, and the demands of breastfeeding. LOL!!

  28. Bethany Hudson says:

    Kelly & KJM – 🙂 Yeah, we Catholics love talking about "vocations"! It's a concept I would love to see broadened in the Protestant Churches…just like I'd like to see more Bible memorization going on among Catholics. Our traditions really do complement one another–because they're all from Christ!
    ~Bethany

  29. Deanna says:

    Sweet Bethany,
    Wouldn’t it be better for both the Protestants and the Catholics to view marriage as a covenant relationship instead of a vocation?
    Vocation sounds less than tender and sterile compared to a covenant.
    Will enjoy reading your reply. Grins…I know you have one.
    Ole Deanna from the Kansas Flinthills

  30. Lady-in-the-Making says:

    I listen to Nancy Leigh DeMoss nearly every day. I really liked this particular address by Mary Kassian, which I saw back in October. I heartily agree with everything she said.

    Thanks for posting it. No darts here – I fully agree with you.

  31. Bethany Hudson says:

    Deanna- Catholics actually take a step further than covenant (which to US sounds sterile); we call Marriage a SACRAMENT! I sacred institution of Christ in which the spouses convey the GRACE of God upon each other with their vows. Vocation is merely the Latin for calling. I don’t think most pastors would view their “vocation” to the ministry as something sterile, though it is seen as something solemn, just as marriage is. So, for Catholics, marriage is a covenant, a Sacrament, and a vocation.
    ~Bethany

  32. Missi says:

    Wow. Okay. Where to begin?

    I would sum up my experience in learning to embrace the obvious role for women found in scripture in two sentences…

    When we lay down our own heavy burdens and take up the cross of Christ, we find that His burden is easy, and His yoke is light. I have never ever experienced such liberty as when I gave up my “rights” and surrendered my lift to Christ.

    Kelly, if all people can find to criticize you for is that you are raising your daughters to b
    e homeschooling mothers, you must be proud!

    How dare you raise your daughters to be capable, creative, entrepreneurial, skilled women who can confidently handle the challenges that life will throw at them!!! Wouldn’t they be better off spending time at the mall with their friends, losing their hearts to young boys, or “experiencing” the thrills of smoking, drinking, and doing drugs?!?!?

    So many times, the Christian community wants to overlook the role that scripture explicitly states for women (keepers at home, loving our husbands, loving our children, birthing children, reaching out to the poor and needy, and having industry based in the home), for something else that it may barely merely permit (singleness, careers that take the heart out of the home, chosen barrenness).

    Thanks so much for sharing this video! It was such an encouragement to watch that I posted it on my own blog!

  33. Bethany Hudson says:

    Missi- Don’t want to be too picky, but Scripture definitely speaks highly of singleness–as long as it is a singlness undertaken by God’s calling and consecrated to Him in chastity and service 🙂 In general though, I applaud what you’ve said.
    ~Bethany

  34. Elizabeth says:

    Kelly, I just read an interesting article, London Times reports that the Bible is not anti-female: is this news?, and thought you would enjoy it.

    Here is the link:
    http://creation.com/london-times-reports-that-the-bible-is-not-anti-female-is-this-news

  35. Anonymous says:

    This is in reference to your post above:
    I wonder how careful your study of feminism has been. While I can make many arguments for or against any movement, particularly feminism, any careful study should involve an discussion of multiple feminisms since there are a number of strands, some of which contradict each other. Careful reading would also reveal that feminism movements predate Marx, and although he did make reference to those movements, many feminists eschew any claims to Marxist Feminism.
    Might I recommend that you try reading a book called Global Gender Issues by Peterson & Runyon? It might help you to make much more informed arguments against Feminisms by accessing a source that its not produced within the blinders of your own worldview.

  36. Clara says:

    Thanks for sharing this video series. I’m enjoying listening to them.

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