The Good News About Your Work Nobody Sees

I drove my oldest son to the work site where my husband is building a barn. It was the first time I’d seen it since it was just a frame structure, and now it had siding and a roof. It stood magnificently, dwarfing all the houses around it. It was grand and perfect. I and everyone else who drives by can see where my husband’s hours, sweat and stress have gone–there’s a fabulous building to evidence all his hard work.

I thought about that this morning as I picked fuzz, paper and socks off the floor–again. In the privacy of my bathroom, no one sees how many times I put the towels back, empty the bath tub from water littles ones forgot to drain (and scrub the resulting residue), straighten things out of place–all just a feeble attempt to avoid getting overrun by clutter. I don’t want to talk about the window sills.

Moms and wives at home feel frazzled. And often they feel resentful or alone. It’s little wonder why the feminist movement so easily persuaded them to leave home. We all crave evidence of our hard work. We want a grand building at the end of the day, to hear the oohs and ahhs. It’s human.

But according to God’s word, we are building something grand, and earthly accolades are not the prize.

“Every wise woman buildeth her house: but the foolish plucketh it down with her hands.” Proverbs 14:1

Only our building is a slower, less noticeable process. We are building homes, which build people, which build legacies, which build the Kingdom. And the stamina to put our hearts, minds and bodies to such a task must be fueled by a vision of what’s ahead. We must set our minds on things above, even in the midst of handling things here.

This work isn’t about the dust bunnies, the spills and the constant striving for order from chaos. This work is about faithfulness, perseverance and understanding that God’s plan for us is perfect, though life is not, and that we are HIS workmanship, created to build right here, for His glory.

I don’t know about you, but I fail so often and the reason for that is I forget this building is for the Kingdom of God.

I get frustrated over squabbles because it interferes with my plans. I should be more concerned with pointing my children to the Lord, showing them how sin infects us, and why we need to repent and trust Christ to help us crucify the flesh.

I get touchy and irritable because someone isn’t meeting my expectations or fulfilling my desires, when I should be humbling myself, being willing to be simply an instrument of grace, sacrificing, not demanding my way. Because that’s how my Savior lived.

We live in a flesh-covered body in a flesh-craving world that aches to be petted and recognized and satisfied. But building like a wise woman requires me to lay aside my wants and expectations, and seek the will of the Father. (“Not my will but Thine be done.”)

Philippians 2 cuts to my heart but friends, this is truly where joy is found! It urges us to “Do nothing out of selfish ambition or conceit, but in humility, consider others better than yourself.” And Christ is given to us for example, that we should “let this mind be in us which was also in Christ Jesus.” He was God. Yet made Himself the lowest, submitting to the Father even to the point of death.

That changes my perspective about my petty annoyances throughout the day.

Yes, you’re going to pick up more lonely shoes in your lifetime than you care to. And probably no one will ever know. But one day your grand work will be displayed, your legacy will stand, and the faithful will be rewarded.

This is not our home and the building we’re working on is not made from hands.

17 Responses to “The Good News About Your Work Nobody Sees”

  1. […] The Good News About Your Work Nobody Sees […]

  2. Claudia says:

    But really, just what I needed to hear. I am not building a barn, but the Kingdom of God. Thank you, Kelly!

  3. Magret says:

    Thanks Kelly :-)
    “Don’t want to talk about the window sills” either, LOL.

  4. Lacey says:

    Thank you for this! It’s so real and relatable. I’ve been throwing myself a pity party lately and oddly enough its not making me feel better. My heart needed this reminder!

  5. Sharon johnson says:

    You read my mail! I can so relate. Thank you for the encouragement.

  6. Mrs. B says:

    Thank you, Kelly. Very refreshing post. I might need to bookmark it–or even make it my computer’s “wallpaper.” :-)

  7. Bonnie says:

    Reminds me of a little post I wrote last fall… somehow, the seasons changing seem to make me notice all the stuff I haven’t gotten to yet (windowsills included!).

  8. Natalie says:

    Dear Kelly, Thank you for the reminder that our work is not in vain. I constantly remind myself to do my work as unto the Lord, not unto men (or children :)). I love the people that I am serving, but much of what parents do is often unnoticed or taken for granted. That is okay. If we do it with a heart of worship, it brings pleasure and glory to our King!

  9. 6 arrows says:

    It’s so much easier to sit at the piano and practice for performances that bring me accolades in the community than it is to quietly perform acts of service for my family…

    Your post came on the heels of the sermon our pastor preached Sunday, based on the part of Mark 9 where the disciples had been arguing who was greatest.

    It’s so easy to crave importance, visibility; and pursue all things me. Pastor talked about how satan tempts us to listen as he whispers things about, for example, the mundane: “You’re too important for that. Let someone else do that lowly work.”

    Very good reminder from Philippians 2, Kelly. (Our pastor quoted from that chapter, as well.)

    Looks like I needed that message from TWO directions this week. :-)

  10. Blessed says:

    Just wanted to say, thanks. It was very encouraging to read this.

  11. Amber says:

    This spoke to my heart so strong! I’ve been mentalizing this same exact thought- selfishness, entitlement, idolatry, and humility, and how it all ebbs and flows together. It feels so good to not be alone. Thank you!

Leave a Reply

Dissenting comments are welcome only in the spirit of "iron sharpening iron"; hateful or angry responses will be removed at my discretion. You may add your gravatar (image) at Gravatar

WordPress Themes